Trip Report: CoffeeShop_ (Bernal Heights)

Posted by on 12 Jan 2014 | Filed under: Beans, Café Society, Fair Trade, Local Brew

Taking a short respite from our series on espresso in Napoli and the Amalfi Coast, we have a couple of local coffee shop reviews to catch up on. One is the obscure and eponymous CoffeeShop_.

This dive of a coffee shop has been operation since 2012, but the overwhelming majority of locals in the neighborhood wouldn’t know it. It kind of defines the term “understated”, so you pretty much have to stumble upon it.

Entrance to CoffeeShop_ on Mission St. in northwest Bernal Heights Since you may miss CoffeeShop_, you can always look for the inconspicuous Roccapulco across the street

It’s a tight space with no seating, inside nor out, though thankfully they do offer their espresso in “for here” cups anyway (Pagnossin cups with no saucer). Though even with the tight space and nothing to sit on, you’ll often find people hanging out inside.

In addition to espresso drinks they sell Hario drip coffee (they also sell the drippers) and baked goods from Batch. Their coffee is proudly sourced from Emeryville’s Ubuntu Coffee Cooperative, which also explains some of the other “hippie crap” on the drink menu such as yerba mate and matcha.

Coffee menu inside the tiny CoffeeShop_ Hario filter brewing and Promac espresso machine inside CoffeeShop_

Using a two-group Promac, they pull shots with a very creamy texture. It has an even-textured medium brown crema with a flavor of pepper and mild spice with some modestly sharp brightness (to let you know the coffee is freshly roasted). But without potent fruitiness or candy-like sweetness.

Three generous sips, and we’re still not entirely sure why the espresso shots get the nickname “Dirty” here. (As in: “I’ll have a Dirty, please.”)

Read the review of CoffeeShop_ in Bernal Heights.

The CoffeeShop_ Promac machine The CoffeeShop_ espresso - or a 'Dirty' as it's also called

Trip Report: Divino Cafè (Forio, Ischia, Italy)

Posted by on 09 Jan 2014 | Filed under: Add Milk, Café Society, Foreign Brew

Santa Maria del Saccorso Church, Forio, IschiaThe town of Forio on Ischia’s west coast has about 17,000 inhabitants and faces a wide-open Tyrrhenian Sea. Because of its exposed location, it boasts numerous coastal watchtowers dating back to the Middle Ages as protection against invading Saracen and African pirates. By the 1950s, the marauding pirates were replaced by an invasion of marauding artists, turning Forio into something of a global artists’ retreat. Rape and pillage comes in many forms.

Yet it remains a beautiful location. There are narrow streets, working painters and ceramic workshops, idyllic views of the volcanic rocks and sea, and Saracen architectural details around town dating back to some of its earliest invaders. Divino Cafè resides near the center of town on a (mostly) pedestrian walkway between fashionable shops and restaurants — with the occasional disturbing breast-implant disaster parading by courtesy of an aging local fashionista. (Prepare about an hour for your scalded eyes to recover.)

Entrance to Divino Cafè in Forio, Ischia Front counter and opening to the upstairs lounge at Divino Cafè in Forio, Ischia

Gambero Rosso Bar d'Italia awards on display inside Divino Cafè in Forio, Ischia Divino Cafè's own notorious Cremina di Caffè

Divino Cafè's outdoor coffee menu featuring variations with its own Cremina di CaffèIt’s a rather small space with a couple of tables in front, an angular serving bar, and a semi-private upstairs lounge (when open). Unlike most coffee shops in the area, they proudly brand themselves with the decidedly not-local Lavazza. Like a number of cafés around Napoli, they proudly offer their own version of a zucchero-crema concoction (literally, “sugar-cream”) — which they call Cremina di Caffè — to optionally add a formulated syrupy sweetness to their variations of espresso drinks. And also like a number of notable coffee shops around Napoli, their list of coffee drinks is long.

Sticking to the basics for review purposes here, they use a three-group La San Marco lever machine to pull shots with an even, medium brown crema. It has a pungent flavor that’s a bit narrow, and its served in Lavazza-logo cups from Cup & Saucer. Rated two chicchi and one tazzina in the 2014 Bar d’Italia.

Read the review of Divino Cafè in Forio d’Ischia, Italy.

The manual lever La San Marco machine at Divino Cafè Espresso at Divino Cafè in Forio, Ischia

Trip Report: Bar Calise a Ischia (Ischia, Italy)

Posted by on 07 Jan 2014 | Filed under: Café Society, Foreign Brew

Despite being a relatively large island, you can get around most of Ischia through a combination of walking and its rather dubious-yet-functional public bus system. Starting from the island’s main transportation hub of Ischia Porto (i.e., the actual ferry port) and the nearby bus terminal, walk east, towards Ischia Ponte, for about a half-mile and you’ll encounter Bar Calise a Ischia.

Roadside sign for Bar Calise off of Via Antonio Sogliuzzo Seating and entrance in the garden at Bar Calise a Ischia

This massive café resides along a more suburban-looking stretch of Ischia’s Via Antonio Sogliuzzo. The Bar Calise owners started their business nearly a century ago in nearby Casamicciola Terme. But in 1960, as the neighborhoods east of Ischia Porto experienced a great deal of expansion and development, the owners branched out to this flagship location on Piazza degli Eroi.

It has several signs off the main road to flag down drivers and an assortment of pedestrians. It also has a rather extensive parking lot (for Italy), a wide swath of outdoor garden seating, and some indoor seating inside the huge café and bar. Besides the various panini, pizza, pastries, and many other edibles, they also serve a decent espresso.

Inside a wing of Bar Calise a Ischia Some of the lush gardens inside Bar Calise a Ischia

Using dueling three-group La Cimbali machines with a gold patina at the rear bar, the professionally dressed baristi pull shots with an even, medium brown crema that’s a bit full in the (Porland) cup for the region. (Though it is still only about three sips.) It’s a dark, rich pour with a good body and some smokiness over that characteristic Passalacqua pungency that characterizes much of Napoli.

Order at the bar for only €1 — though most patrons order the table service version for €3 with a relatively flavorless cookie served over the top of the cup. Rated two tazzine and one chicco in the 2014 Bar d’Italia.

Read the review of Bar Calise a Ischia in Ischia, Italy.

Baristi at Bar Calise a Ischia operating their La Cimbali The Bar Calise a Ischia espresso

Trip Report: Bar Cocò (Ischia Ponte, Italy)

Posted by on 03 Jan 2014 | Filed under: Café Society, Foreign Brew

Like it’s more famous and cosmopolitan sister, the island of Ischia resides in the Gulf of Naples. But that’s where the similarities end.

Capri draws mostly international tourists on day trips seeking the fashionable high-life. Years ago while hiking Capri’s (highly recommended) Villa Jovis around 8am one Sunday morning, a peek over a cliff’s edge revealed a marine invasion of ferries and tour boats from all directions that must have rivaled D-Day on the beaches of Normandy.

castello Aragonese at Ischia Ponte Entrance to Bar Cocò in the shadow of Ischia's Castello Aragonese

By contrast, Ischia draws far more tourists and yet has a completely different feel. For one, 80% of the tourists are Italians — most of whom stay overnight. Ischia is a larger island and supports a much greater number of local residents, giving it a strong sense of community. The island feels more like a connected suburb of Napoli (despite the one-hour-plus boat ride). And then there are the spas and hot springs.

For San Francisco area residents, imagine if Angel Island was encircled by a few smaller, more casual versions of Sausalito. Except Ischia goes back to at least Greek settlers in the 8th century B.C.

Italians socializing at Bar Cocò along the castle bridge Italians strolling past Bar Cocò in the shadow of the Castello Aragonese on Ischia

All generations socialize outside of Bar Cocò Footbridge from Castello Aragonese to the main town of Ischia Ponte

As for Ristorante e Bar Cocò: what a complete scene. It’s hard to overstate how much this local café resides at the center of an entire island’s social fabric. A combination bar and restaurant, this Ischia institution opened in 1951. The island locals who flock here partly do so out of the quality of the place, but perhaps moreso because of its stunning location: along the shores at the base of the footpath that leads to the dramatic Castello Aragonese.

The island of Ischia from Castello AragoneseBuilt by Hiero I, tyrant of Sicily, in 474 B.C., the site of this castle has since been alternatively sacked/occupied/expanded by Parthenopeans, Romans, Visigoths, Vandals, Goths, Arabs, Normans, Swabians, the Angioini, English, and the Bourbons.

Mornings, afternoons, and (in particular) evenings, people gather at this watering hole at the base of the footpath to eat, drink, and mostly socialize beneath the shadow of the castle. There are many Italians sitting out front for table service beneath a thatched roof (where they serve €1.70 espresso instead of the in-bar €1). Inside there’s only a cashier and standing at the bar — other than seating inside the neighboring restaurant with shorter hours.

Thatched entrance to Bar Cocò Service bar area inside Bar Cocò

At the bar they use a four-group lever La San Marco machine to pull dense, syrupy shots of Caffè Moreno. It has a dense thickness and outstanding body with an even, dark brown crema that looks a bit like a dark brown egg yolk at times.

A two-sips short shot with a deep, darker flavor of pungent herbs and cloves served in Cocò-logo IPA cups. No wonder the 2014 Bar d’Italia rated them two chicchi (and one tazzina).

Read the review of Bar Cocò in Ischia Ponte, Italy.

Manual La San Marco machine at the bar inside Bar Cocò The Bar Cocò espresso

Entrance to the neighboring Ristoranti Cocò along the footbridge The Bar Cocò logo IPA espresso cup is an homage to the Castello Aragonese

Trip Report: Pasticceria Napoli (Maiori, Italy)

Posted by on 31 Dec 2013 | Filed under: Café Society, Foreign Brew

Along the Amalfi Coast, Maiori is the larger counterpart to nearby Minori. Like Minori, its roots date back before the Romans: it was founded by the Etruscans under the name “Reghinna Major” (with Minori as “Reghinna Minor”). Unlike Minori, Maiori is a larger, “L”-shaped town and boasts the longest unbroken stretch of beach along the Amalfi Coast.

Coastal panoramic view of Maiori, Italy - courtesy of Wikipedia

Maiori's long Corso Regina leading up from the beach Maiori's Corso Regina looking back to the beach

The place where that “L” draws back from the coastline and climbs inland is the broad Corso Regina, marking the social and commercial heart of Maiori separate from the town’s attractive beachfront promenade. Pasticceria Napoli is located along that Corso Regina — a few blocks up from the beach. It is a tiny, local establishment. While it lacks the service volume, finesse, and notoriety of a Sal de Riso (in nearby Minori), it’s an excellent local example of a neighborhood pastry and espresso shop.

The small, non-descript space has a few indoor, colorful-plastic-backed café tables. There’s often a number of tasty baked goods on display, and behind the bar (with its prominent Illy branding) is a two-group La Cimbali machine.

Entrance fo Pasticceria Napoli in Maiori, Italy - with Illy branding Inside Pasticceria Napoli, overlooking the pastry case back towards the entrance

With it, they preheat the Illy-logo SPAL cups and pull shots with an even medium brown crema of good thickness and no heat spots. It has an Illy flavor of wood and spice, but with a robustness typical to Illy when consumed in Italy. The barista here can be a character but extremely friendly: the staff here are known for their exceptional friendliness.

Rated a respectable two tazzine and two chicchi in the 2014 Bar d’Italia. A solid effort for a mere €0.80.

Read the review of Pasticceria Napoli in Maiori, Italy.

Pasticceria Napoli's La Cimbali machine The Pasticceria Napoli espresso

Trip Report: Sal de Riso (Minori, Italy)

Posted by on 29 Dec 2013 | Filed under: Foreign Brew

Returning to our reviews of espresso in Napoli and the Amalfi Coast…

The tiny coastal village of Minori has roots dating as far back as a Roman Maritime Archeological Villa established here at sea level in the 1st century B.C. (and excavated only since 1932). Minori is also home to the venerated remains of a female martyr from Sicily, Saint Trofimena, whose bones washed ashore in an urn here during the 9th century — inspiring a nearby basilica that bears her name.

A brooding Santa Trofimena Monument in Minori, Italy Basilica di Santa Trofimena sits at the end of an alley to the left of Sal De Riso

Perhaps a more modern place of worship in town is Pasticceria Sal de Riso. Since 1908, the De Riso family has operated a bar/tobacconist’s shop in the heart of Minori. They earned a reputation along the entire Amalfi Coast for the gelati and lemon granita they made. The latest generation is embodied in Salvatore De Riso, who started this seaside confectionary in 1989 and has grown its operations and reputation ever since. In 2010-2011, this was named the “Pasticcere dell’Anno” — or the Italian national pastry shop of the year.

It’s located right in front of the Basilica di Santa Trofimena, in the center of the small town, and it offers seating upstairs and ample piazza seating out front overlooking the beach. In addition to their nationally recognized pastries, they also serve gelato, various liquors at their full bar, panini, and — of course — espresso.

Entrance to Sal de Riso in Minori Inside Sal de Riso in Minori

Legendary pastries at Sal de Riso in Minori Gelato at Sal de Riso in Minori

Using a large, three-group La Cimbali M39, they pull short shots at a higher serving temperature with a medium to darker brown crema and a lighter heat spot on the surface. Using Trucillo coffee from Salerno, they produce a cup (an elegant one made by Tafelstern, btw) that has a pungent flavor with strong herbal elements. An inexpensive €0.90 for espresso at a café rated 2 tazzine and 2 chicchi in the 2014 Bar d’Italia.

Read the review of Sal de Riso in Minori, Italy.

Sal de Riso's La Cimbali machine The Sal de Riso espresso

Trip Report: Espresso in Eataly Chicago

Posted by on 23 Dec 2013 | Filed under: Consumer Trends, Foreign Brew, Machine, Roasting

Six years ago we wrote about the original Eataly in Torino, Italy. Since then, Eataly crossed the Atlantic with a wildly successful New York City opening in August 2010. Earlier this month, Eataly Chicago opened — and boy, did it open. Within its first week of operation, it had to shut down for two days just to retrench for the customer demand onslaught.

At 63,000 square feet, Eataly Chicago is a little larger than the one in New York City, but still only about half the size of the original in Torino. (It actually seems small by comparison to that former Carpano factory.) But surprisingly, despite the many cultural and personnel differences from Italy, Eataly Chicago mostly stays true to its roots at the original.

Eataly Chicago beckons the tourists off Mag Mile Inside Eataly Chicago

Eataly Chicago sticks to recognizably common branding with its mothership. Food slogans are prominently offered in English and Italian. Even its supply chain has a lot in common — from Lurisia water, to exquisite wines from Prunotto and Albino Rocca, to Baratti & Milano chocolates.

And yet there are distribution anomalies. Nutella crêpes and Lavazza bars are totally incongruous from the Slow Food-driven, small producer focus as in Eataly in Italy. And what American supermarket doesn’t carry Barilla pasta? Meanwhile, Eataly Torino would promote meat from a specific breed of rabbit that would die out if not for the careful and deliberate cultivation of its species.

Eataly Chicago's sponsors - with a noticeable lack of some of the core team from Italy Meat counter inside Eataly Chicago

Of course, encouraging patrons to “eat local” is naturally going to be incongruous with being a massive Italian import store. We recognize that some concessions must be made to remain commercially viable. Hence why American-friendly celebrity chefs, such as Mario Batali and Lidia & Joe Bastianich, are prominently featured — whereas Italian restauranteur geniuses behind the original Eataly, such as Piero Alciati, are not. The shelves of food books by Batali-buddy Gwyneth Paltrow may have made us throw up in our mouths a little, but we understand why she’s there.

There are two coffee purveyors within Eataly Chicago. Unlike Eataly Torino, they may not showcase the use of Slow Food coffee bean stocks from Huehuetenango, Guatemala as roasted by Torinese prison inmates. But they chose two purveyors that are recognizably Piemontese: Lavazza and Caffè Vergnano.

Lavazza

Lavazza is no stranger to Chicago, so it’s a little odd that they were chosen as one of two coffee purveyors in Eataly Chicago. Especially since Eataly was founded on small, local purveyors within the radar of the Slow Food movement, and Lavazza is the largest coffee distributor in Italy.

Located next to the Nutella crêpe bar on first floor of Eataly Chicago, they offer decorative baked items in addition to a hot and cold “Dolcezze Lavazza” specialty drinks menu. They offer seating along a curved window counter in the main corner of Eataly Chicago.

Main counter at Eataly Chicago's Lavazza bar Curved serving and consuming counters at Eataly Chicago's Lavazza bar

Using dueling three-group La Cimbali machines, they pull shots with a mottled medium brown crema. They serve them properly short — but not too strongly flavored of a fresher Lavazza flavor profile of toasted spices and pungency. For milk-frothing, they produce a rich and creamy microform with token latte art. Surprisingly rather solid.

Read the review of Lavazza at Eataly Chicago.

The Eataly Chicago Lavazza espresso and cappuccino Close-up of the Eataly Chicago Lavazza espresso

Caffè Vergnano

This is Chicago’s installment of a series of chain roasters and cafés based in Italy’s Piemonte region, but with multiple locations in international locations such as London.

Located on the second floor of Eataly Chicago, it’s a no-frills affair with six coffee blends available for purchase and only two different kinds of prepared coffee drinks for retail purchase: an espresso and a caffè macchiato in single and doppio sizes. Not even the cappuccino makes the list here, and we admire them for sticking to their guns and ensuring it’s about the coffee and not the milk.

Caffè Vergnano at Eataly Chicago Caffè Vergnano's Elektra Belle Epoque Verticale at Eataly Chicago

A walk-up bar service with three marble countertops in front, they use a gorgeous, chrome, three-group Elektra Belle Epoque Verticale to pull shots with an even, darker brown crema with a small heat spot. It has a heartier aroma of darker flavors with a flavor profile consisting of chocolate and some herbal pungency all in balance.

Served with a packaged Caffè Vergnano 1882 biscoffee biscuit on the side, it is surprisingly better than its Italian equivalent — although we may have caught their Alba location on an off day. With a small glass of still water optionally served on the side of their logo block IPA cups.

Read the review of Caffè Vergnano at Eataly Chicago.

The Caffè Vergnano espresso and macchiato at Eataly Chicago Close-up of the Caffè Vergnano espresso at Eataly Chicago

Service area at the Eataly Chicago Lavazza bar Service and seating area near the Eataly Chicago Caffè Vergnano

Trip Report: Bar Il Panino (Ravello, Italy)

Posted by on 16 Dec 2013 | Filed under: Foreign Brew

This tiny bar is one of the “four horsemen”/anchor tenants of Ravello’s main Piazza Duomo (Vescovado). Closer to the Villa Rufolo side, Bar Il Panino’s covered outdoor seating is among the first you see when entering the square from the main road/tunnel (i.e., via della Repubblica).

Wedged at the right-hand base of the steps leading up to Ravello’s Duomo, locals hang out here to play cards, socialize, and pretty much pass the time. Inside the quarters are tight, with a small bar serving liquor, gelato, cornetti, and a two-group La Cimbali for espresso. They also offer their namesake panini, of course.

Entrance to Bar Il Panino in Ravello, Italy ar the right side of the Duomo steps Some of the outdoor seating for Bar Il Panino in the piazza

They serve Illy espresso in Illy-logo SPAL cups with a richly striped medium and darker brown crema. It has that brighter Illy flavor you get in Italy but not in the U.S.: bright spices, a touch of smoke, and also some acidity of apricot and a touch of citrus. If only they could serve Illy like this in the States. An even €1.

Read the review of Bar Il Panino in Ravello, Italy.

La Cimbali behind the tiny bar inside Bar Il Panino in Ravello, Italy The Bar Il Panino espresso

Trip Report: Ristorante Don Alfonso 1890 (Sant’Agata sui due Golfi, Italy)

Posted by on 08 Dec 2013 | Filed under: Foreign Brew, Restaurant Coffee, Roasting

This restaurant is often considered the best in Southern Italy and certainly one of its most famous. It’s earned two Michelin stars, and it’s known as something of a Chez Panisse of Italy: an emphasis on locally grown ingredients sourced from the chef’s 6 hectare farm, Le Peracciole (purchased in 1990), but elevated to a fine dining experience.

Located at the heart of the remote hill town of Sant’Agata sui due Golfi, it’s situated on a mountain ridge that overlooks both the Gulf of Naples and the Gulf of Salerno (hence the town’s name). Driving up in a torrential downpour, we accidentally pulled in for cover into the garage for the restaurant service staff — decorated with large murals of various fruits and vegetables — and arrived via the service entrance. Not that it mattered, because whether we stumbled upon the pre-service staff dinner or found ourselves in part of the kitchen, the staff were exceptionally friendly and accommodating.

Ristorante Don Alfonso 1890 - in less stormy times Kitchen prep inside Ristorante Don Alfonso 1890

Alfonso Costanzo Iaccarino started this operation as a hotel in 1890. Today it is both a hotel and restaurant (the latter begun in 1973) owned and operated by Livia and Alfonso Iaccarino. The two patrol the dining room with its pink and white walls, ensuring their brigade offers impeccable service (and it very much is).

One of the few buildings on site is La Cantina, their world-famous, 25,000-bottle wine cellar. It begins as you enter a 17th century Neapolitan building. It then leads to an earlier wing from the 16th century. And it then descends some 40 meters at an angle into the earth into what was originally a 6th century Etruscan tomb. At the bottom of the tomb they also age some of their cheeses.

Don Alfonso 1890's custom coffee blend from Caffè Maresca Old bottles inside Don Alfonso 1890's La Cantina

Descending into Don Alfonso 1890's 6th century Etruscan tomb Inside Don Alfonso 1890's 6th century Etruscan tomb

Besides the over-the-top tasting menu (eel mousse?!), they also offer a coffee service that aspires to the level of uniqueness and memorability as the food here. (Contrast with the more pedestrian — albeit top-quality — approach taken by Copenhagen’s Noma.)

They wood-roast their own private coffee label through nearby Caffè Maresca, and they swear by La San Marco as the best espresso machines they can get their hands on. They pull very short shots of espresso with a darker and medium brown crema and heavy chocolate tones to the flavor, and they serve it in cartoon-colorful Solimene ceramic cups from Vietri sul Mare with lids and two saucers.

Eel mousse? Part of a tasting course at Don Alfonso 1890 Food porn: pasta and black truffles at Don Alfonso 1890

Inside Don Alfonso 1890's dining room Alfonso Iaccarino patrolling the dining room at Don Alfonso 1890

To create a more unique experience, they serve their espresso with five different sugars — each produced at different levels of refinement. It may not be close to the best espresso we’ve ever had, but they clearly make the effort and do what you’d expect from such a special restaurant to make the coffee service equally as memorable. At least more than just the sticker shock you get from its €5 price tag.

As over-the-top Italian restaurants go, Don Alfonso 1890 offers some of the best service we’ve experienced anywhere. The food is outstanding and showcases an emphasis on simple, quality ingredients for which Southern Italy is known. That said, we’d still have to give a slight edge to more of the culinary refinement you’ll find at a place like Guido Ristorante Pollenzo up north.

Read the review of Ristorante Don Alfonso 1890 in Sant’Agata sui due Golfi, Italy.

French press coffee being prepared as part of a dessert in the kitchen at Don Alfonso 1890 Sugar at various levels of refinement at Don Alfonso 1890

Coffee service at Don Alfonso 1890 Espresso at Don Alfonso 1890

Trip Report: La Zagara (Positano, Italy)

Posted by on 07 Dec 2013 | Filed under: Foreign Brew

Positano may be a gorgeous place, but it is overrun with tourists. But given all there is to look at and experience, Positano is one of those rare places where you don’t seem to mind it too much. It’s frequently one of the costs of a beautiful place.

Opening in 1950 as a pastry shop, La Zagara resides along a pedestrian walkway that leads to the famous and fashionable Positano beach. The location shows a bit of its worn age — especially in the wood paneling in the (full) bar area.

Entrance to La Zagara along a Positano pedestrian walkway to the beach La Zagara breaks out the fine grappa for the tourists

For the tourists, they offer a great selection of high-end grappe (Berta Roccanivo, etc.). While the entirely Napoli region loves to partake in a digestivo, cafés on the Amalfi Coast seem to have particularly taken to selling high-end grappa as take-home gifts and mementos.

La Zagara still offers notable pastries — including an excellent cannoli. Cannoli may have been put on the map by the Sicilians, but the Neapolitans have made their own variant somewhat famous. There’s also a large garden bar with outdoor views under canopies that overlook one of Positano’s many canyon-like features. It’s a tempting place to kill time, having done that ourselves 11 years ago.

Entrance to La Zagara's garden patio La Zagara's time-killing patio

Using dueling two-group La Cimbali machines at the bar, they pull shots of Caffè Maresca with a medium brown crema with lighter heat spot and some small bubbling. It’s served short in Güral Porselen logo cups. It has a flavor of some tobacco layered with Maresca’s wood-roasting.

An old fashioned €1 for tourist central. Rated 2 tazzine and 1 chicco in the 2014 Gambero Rosso Bar d’Italia.

Read the review of La Zagara in Positano, Italy.

La Cimbali machine and packed bar at La Zagara The La Zagara espresso

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