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Trip Report: Noble Folk Ice Cream & Pie Bar (Healdsburg, CA)

Posted by on 27 Jan 2015 | Filed under: Foreign Brew, Local Brew

This renowned pie bar (/bakery) and ice cream shop opened in May 2014 to a lot of wine country accolades. And although coffee isn’t in their name, they also give a significant nod to their coffee service.

It’s a simplistic storefront off of the historic Healdsburg Town Square. Everything is covered in white-painted wood — or at least so it seems — giving it a turn-of-the-20th-century medical office feel. Or something from the set of The Knick.

They have a few metal stools and chairs with window counter seating and a couple of café tables. There are pies, there is ice cream, there’s merchandising on two wall shelves, and there’s the coffee service.

Entrance to Noble Folk Ice Cream & Pie Bar in Healdsburg, CA Seating with a wall of merchandising inside Noble Folk

Pies at the Noble Folk Pie Bar register Coffee and other merchandising at Noble Folk's opposite wall

Coffee menu and La Marzocco Linea at Noble Folk Ice Cream & Pie BarUsing a two-group La Marzocco Linea, they pull shots of Stumptown with a modestly thin, even brown crema. It has a flavor of simple spices with a more balanced finish of some light pepper and chocolatey notes. Even so, it’s a little bit of an underachiever for its pedigree. And yet it works anyway. Served in black Espresso Parts cups.

Their macchiato runs a bit creamy without a clear milk-to-espresso definition in the cup. The milk-frothing runs a bit dry and not well integrated into their drinks.

Overall, it’s a viable alternative to The Goat: even if the quality isn’t quite there, the Stumptown beans give it something of an alternative flavor profile for the town.

Read the review of Noble Folk Ice Cream & Pie Bar in Healdsburg, CA.

Noble Folk is a femine place, and it's reflected in its patrons The Noble Folk espresso

Trip Report: Illy Caffè (Union St., Cow Hollow)

Posted by on 31 Dec 2014 | Filed under: Add Milk, Café Society, Consumer Trends, Home Brew, Local Brew, Quality Issues, Roasting

illy caffè North America has operated Espressamente cafés here as in Europe, but this example is modeled more after a truer café rather than coffee bar per se. As such, Illy has designated it with a different name (“illy caffè”).

However, that hasn’t stopped many confused locals who still insist on calling it “Espressamente.” (I dare anyone to find the word “Espressamente” written anywhere inside or out of this place.) The lesson here is to be careful how you brand yourself: once it starts working, the blinders come out and you may have a difficult time getting people to change.

Outside the illy caffè on Union St. Entrance to the illy caffè on Union St. - with espresso cup chandelier

Unlike Illy’s Espressamente coffee bars, the food menu here — while still designed by the famed Joyce Goldstein — is a bit more involved. The service levels are also just a touch higher.

illy caffè's tasting menu for the media brunchIt’s not too much of a surprise that Illy decided to pull off this subtle concept shift here in San Francisco. Back in 2011, the Espressamente on Battery St. opened as America’s first free-standing example of the chain (i.e., not linked to a hotel, etc.). Like SF’s other Illy locations, it’s run by Joe Gurdock and the Prima Cosa team. Joe is an SF native with local coffee roots dating back to managing Pasqua Coffee cafés here in the 1990s.

Earlier this month illy caffè North America invited me to a media brunch for this café’s opening, with much of their executive team flying in from New York and parts east. I’m not easily impressed by these sorts of events, but I came away from the event with an even greater appreciation for what Illy does and what they are as a company.

Blind spots in our perceived history of quality coffee

There’s a tendency in today’s self-described “craft” coffee community to claim credit for much of anything good about coffee these days — even if most of it consists of small modifications built upon a sizable foundation of older, established arts. There’s also a lot of fawning over anything that smells new — often much of which is just new to those who haven’t dug deep enough. Meanwhile, many might roll their eyes over a “coffee dinosaur” like Illy.

Case and point with the latest coffee roasting guide du jour. Now we very much enjoy’s Scott Rao’s practical, hands-on books, and his latest The Coffee Roaster’s Companion is a good reference. Yet we know a number of craft coffee types who regard it as highly technical manual, oblivious to some of its glaring predecessors.

Joe Gurdock, at right, with Barry Sheldon, President and COO of illy caffè North America, at the head of the table Illy's Frisée Salad with illy coffee vinaigrette and egg on top

Just take Chapter 4 of Andrea Illy‘s (editor and Illy chairman) Espresso Coffee: The Science of Quality. This chapter dedicated to coffee roasting introduces thermodynamic differential equations, diagrams of three-dimensional thermal gradients within roasting beans over time, tables of chemical compounds and their resulting odors from roasting, ion chromatography charts, structural formulas of the changing organic chemistry bonds in roasting coffee, and references to 91 scientific coffee papers. No disrespect to Mr. Rao, but by comparison on a technical scale you could call his book Coffee Roasting for Dummies.

The converted Metro Theater on Union Street now houses an illy caffè at the near cornerAs another example of this cognitive gap, media people and Illy reps sat around a large, shared table at this brunch event. One of the media invitees was a freelance writer for 7×7 and other food-friendly publications (who shall remain nameless). I had mentioned how most so-called Third Wave roasters were abject underachievers at the subtle art of coffee blending, and she interjected by saying she thought that the Third Wave was instead identified more by medium roast levels.

Forget for a moment that Dunkin’ Donuts has been medium roasting their coffee pretty much since the invention of the donut. While taking furious notes, she straight-face asked the Illy reps about how they were positioned with their darker roasts in this modern taste era of Third Wave medium roasting.

Illy has been selling coffees clearly labelled “Medium Roast” before many of these Third Wave roasters were even in diapers. Thus I thought her question was honestly a little offensive. But the Illy team, probably used to being perceived as playing catch-up rather than leading the charge in coffee these days, politely answered her question without any hint of judgement. (I probably would have had to restrain myself from punching her in the throat.)

Illy was also pioneering coffee subscription models as early as 2004, years before the Third Wavy new coffee middlemen injected themselves into the supply chain.

The illy caffè illy-Misu Housemade Tiramisu illy caffè's Jasmine Vanilla Botanical Latte

Now Illy is hardly perfect, and this post isn’t intended as an Illy love-fest. Responding to commercial pressure, they’ve bowed to some regrettable-but-business-necessary fads, such as creating their own pod system coffee and promoting dubious home espresso machines. Their coffee here in the U.S. — while employing outstanding quality controls — has never measured up to the quality standards I’ve experienced at their cafés in Europe.

But besides Illy’s many great investments in quality and to the science of coffee, the company has won awards for its ethics. They’ve been actively invested in the economic and environmental sustainability of coffee far longer than any other coffee company I know. They essentially pioneered the Direct Trade model years before it was ever called that. And they’ve done all that without the modern sledgehammer-to-the-head, profit-from-consumer-guilt practice of publicly blowing their own horn over their commitment to Corporate Social Responsibility.

Close-up of the illy caffè chandelier - and Francis Ford Coppola designer cups Close-up of the illy caffè chandelier - and the unique Federico Fellini designer cup in the foreground

Review of illy caffè

Was there espresso to be reviewed here again? Of course!

This café is located at the edge of the former Metro Theater, which has since been converted into an insipidly boring and culturally irrelevant Equinox gym.

There’s an elaborate designer Illy coffee cup chandelier as you walk in — a hallmark of many other Espressamente shops, but different for the rarity of some of the limited edition art cups. Since 1992, Illy’s designer cup series is technically the longest running pop art project in the world. (Their continued investment in the arts is another cool aspect of the company.) There’s a tall table with stools, some window stool seating, central café tables, and black booth café seating around the edges.

The illy caffè service counter with La Cimbali machine The illy caffè espresso

The illy caffè macchiato The illy caffè cappuccino

Using a chrome, three-group La Cimbali, they pull moderately-sized shots with a healthy, mottled/swirled medium and darker brown crema. The crema isn’t as thick as you typically get in a European Espressamente, but it’s decent.

The flavor isn’t exactly the typical mild spaces and wood that you get at most American outlets serving Illy: there are extra notes in between in the flavor profile. So while still not up to European standards, this is one of their best attempts yet. Served in designer IPA logo cups, of course.

Milk-frothing here is decent: somewhat dense, even, and with little erratic touches here and there. They also offer signature drinks, including botanicals like their vanilla jasmine or lavender lattes — if you like that sort of thing.

Read the review of Illy Caffè on Union St. in Cow Hollow.

Trip Report: Wrecking Ball Coffee Roasters (Union St., Cow Hollow)

Posted by on 29 Dec 2014 | Filed under: Café Society, Local Brew, Roasting

Taking its name from the 2013 hit single by Miley Cyrus…

OK, no, seriously.

While the dynamic duo of Trish Rothgeb’s roasting combined with Nick Cho’s barista and service know-how (and hopefully someone else’s tax accounting) has been in the Bay Area for quite a few years, tracking their coffee house openings and closings has been a bit like playing Whac-A-Mole. Seemingly married to the disposable, throwaway culture of pop-ups, you could be excused for mistaking Wrecking Ball for a roving coffee art exhibit meant to simulate the transience and vagrancy of America’s foster care system.

Under the stairwell lies the latest Wrecking Ball Coffee Roasters Close-up of Wrecking Ball's entrance

Pineapple wallpaper in the Wrecking Ball entrance Merchandising inside Wrecking Ball

This latest location opened in August 2014 in a former That Takes the Cake. It appears as a converted in-law unit at the base of a Victorian home (or law office). In front there is some quaint yard furniture with miniature table and chair seating along the sidewalk — along with a sign to notify the staff for clean-up when you’re done.

Kalita pour-over bar inside Wrecking BallInside everything seems whitewashed as was vogue with San Francisco home interiors of the 1950s — save for the blue pineapple wallpaper at the entrance and black wood flooring. There are three chairs sitting at their Kalita pour over bar and long bench seating along the entryway.

They offer baked goods from Marla, they sport some antique brewing equipment along their shelves, and during the day they seem to be frequented by a disproportionate number of snobby expat Europeans wearing designer jeans and sportcoats that work in the neighborhood.

Using a white, two-group La Marzocco Strada behind the small counter, they pull shots of their 1UP blend with an even but richly textured medium brown crema. It has a balanced flavor of spices of cinnamon, a little allspice, some sharp acidity, and the suggestion — but not implementation — of deeper, richer body notes. As such, the flavor profile seemed a touch incomplete relative to the last pop-up shop that served us. However, it’s still distinctive as far as San Francisco espresso styles go. Served in a white Inker demitasse.

Visit now before it closes.

Read the review of Wrecking Ball Coffee Roasters on Union St. in Cow Hollow.

Wrecking Ball's La Marzocco Strada The Wrecking Ball espresso

On Coffee, Wine, the Napa Valley, and CIA Greystone

Posted by on 16 Nov 2014 | Filed under: Foreign Brew, Local Brew, Quality Issues

In addition to my rather obsessive love of coffee and evaluating its various flavors and aromas, I’ve made no secret of my equally fond appreciation of good wine. How much the two are connected — though sometimes at arm’s length — has been a running topic on this blog over the years. That theme repeated itself again when earlier this month I attended a weekend course called Sensory Analysis of Wine at the Culinary Institute of America at Greystone, in Napa Valley’s St. Helena.

Coincidentally, this week’s new episode of the Esquire Network’s The Getaway featured the Napa Valley and was hosted by Twin Peaksdamn fine cup of coffee” legend, the actor and now winemaker Kyle MacLachlan. Here’s a spot where he visits Napa’s Oxbow Public Market with Carissa Mondavi for coffee at Ritual Coffee Roasters:

In the video short, Carissa mentions the aromatic descriptors in coffee that you also find for wine. Which brings us back to the CIA course further up-valley. Located in a beautiful campus built in the 1880s as a co-operative winery (and since handed down from the Christian Brothers on down), it was purchased by the CIA in 1993 for use as their West Coast campus.

Foggy morning driving up the Napa Valley to the CIA at Greystone Hot air balloons rise over the road to the CIA at Greystone

Through the morning fog of St. Helena to CIA at Greystone Arriving at the CIA at Greystone in St. Helena

The course was taught by John Beuchsenstein, a veteran winemaker and wine sensory evaluation expert of some 30 years. Perhaps most notably, he’s a co-author of the Standardized System of Wine Aroma Terminology, also known as the Wine Aroma Wheel. It inspired the familiar SCAA Coffee Flavor Wheel, and John remembers the time when his work influenced the Coffee Flavor Wheel’s creation.

The two-day course was both an intensive lesson on the organic chemistry behind wine aromas, flavors, and defects and a hands-on lab where students tested their skills at learning and detecting these components. Volatile organic compounds such as 4-VG, 4-EP, esters, phenols, and fusel alcohols all represent the sort of chemical cause-and-effect linkages that have been long established for wine. However coffee is only just now getting a handle on similar chemical markers and how they impact the flavors and aromas of coffee.

Main campus at the CIA at Greystone Sensory Analysis of Wine classroom at the CIA at Greystone

John Beuchsenstein teaching Sensory Analysis of Wine at CIA at Greystone Homework assignments in the Sensory Analysis of Wine at CIA at Greystone

The good news for coffee is that the research is coming, but it will take time. As noted in the scientific paper on wine linked above, the wine industry has established standardized “recipes” for creating wine’s fundamental aromas and flavors. These form a foundation for a common sensory wine vocabulary. If you want a model for tobacco, there’s a base wine and an amount of off-the-shelf elements you can use to create that reference sensation, and you can dial it up or down in concentration to train your sensitivity to it.

Another parallel? Dr. Ann C. Noble at UC Davis had been using spider charts to model the sensory analysis of wines well over 30 years ago — something green bean buyers from SweetMaria’s would strongly identify with today. A major departure? Wine just doesn’t have coffee’s temperature-sensitive bands where different aspects of its flavor and aroma profile shift dramatically.

Sweet Maria's Moka Kadir blend evaluated on a tasting card/spider graph Student demonstration kitchens inside the CIA at Greystone and their watery-to-the-point-of-being-homeopathic Equator Estate coffee in Fetco brewers

The Bakery Cafe by Illy at CIA Greystone

Also of note is that the CIA at Greystone is one of the homes of Illy‘s Università del Caffè — a fact that Illy Master Barista, Giorgio Milos, pointed out to me when I ran into him at an Illy Art in the Street event at The NwBlk in the Mission last month. (Do check out his semi-controversial article on the limited praises of pod coffee in last month’s Coffee Talk.)

Courses at the Università del Caffè are infrequent, but the CIA at Greystone has a permanent coffee outlet on exhibit in the form of The Bakery Cafe by Illy. Sure, many culinary students and staff drink watery Equator Estate Coffee from the Fetco brewers in the demonstration kitchens at the CIA. But this bakery/café opened in April 2012 as an outlet for where CIA students could serve lunch, baked goods, and café fare to the general public.

With heavy Illy branding near the De Baun Theater, it’s also next to a CIA counter behind glass walls that serves wine, charcuterie, and chocolate confections. They offer baked bread and cookies, sandwiches, soups, salads, side dishes (good French fries, btw), wines by the glass, and of course — coffee.

The Bakery Cafe by Illy at the CIA at Greystone and its La Cimbali machine Service counter at The Bakery Cafe by Illy

The Bakery Cafe by Illy's espresso on Saturday The Bakery Cafe by Illy's espresso on Sunday

There are multiple indoor tables and chairs with table service (and ordering at the counter) and colorful hanging lights. Using a two-group La Cimbali XP1 chrome beauty behind the counter, fed by the big Illy can-o-beans, the same students pulled shots that varied wildly in the two times we visited for lunch over a weekend course here.

The staff wear “Illy-approved” fashionable shoes with the men sporting skinny ties like wannabe metro Europeans. With their service model carrying drinks to your table when they are ready, this clearly contributes to a lot of the variance. (Coincidentally, Giorgio Milos frequently talks about about the challenges of consistency with table service.)

On Saturday’s class day it had no crema beyond a tinge of cloudiness on the surface of what seemed like drip coffee crossed with a weak hot chocolate. It had a flat flavor with little brightness, a surprisingly decent body, but little to excite beyond that: a stale-seeming shot with no Illy woodiness, etc.: a shot that scored well on some properties but completely failed on others.

Then on Sunday the shot came with a darkly speckled brown crema, a solid aroma, and a warming flavor of mild spices and wood in balance that you come to expect of Illy. Nothing at the quality level of their European cafés (it’s always a much better product there for some reason), but an all-around shot of decent quality. So it’s very hard to tell you what you will get here, other than an erratic performance by students and a seeming lack of quality control intervening. Other than it’s served in Illy logo IPA cups.

Read the review of The Bakery Cafe by Illy in the CIA at Greystone, St. Helena, CA.

Trip Report: Pinhole Coffee (Bernal Heights)

Posted by on 29 Oct 2014 | Filed under: Add Milk, Café Society, Local Brew

JoEllen Depakakibo got her start in coffee at the North Side Chicago Intelligentsia mothership before moving to the Bay Area and working for nine years with Blue Bottle Coffee. In Sept. 2014 she opened this coffee shop in an 1890s building that was once a neighborhood butcher shop (curiously enough with Avedano’s butchers nearby).

There is popular bench seating along the front Cortland sidewalk, warm wooden flooring inside, acacia stump stools, a mural by JoEllen’s brother, Joey D, and a wall of colorful stripes by local artist Leah Rosenberg. Older soul tunes filled the space on our visit, which really worked (Otis Redding, Ray Charles, etc.) There aren’t many tables (one large one), but the cozy seating works. And as any Bernal shop does de rigueur, there are dog treats for “guests”.

Entrance to Pinhole Coffee on Cortland Ave. Leah Rosenberg wall inside Pinhole Coffee

They use three different bean sources for various brew types: Verve Streetlevel for espresso, a Linea Caffè Brazil for pour-over, and Blue Bottle in a Fetco for “quick drip” (James Freeman would probably roll his eyes). They also have a rather unique brew bar setup, employing a handmade copper kettle and cherrywood drip bar as part of their collaboration with Toronto-based Monarch Methods.

Using a 1989 two-group La Marzocco Linea that JoEllen first used at Blue Bottle (since refinished), they pull shots of Streetlevel with a mottled even and lighter brown crema. It’s potent and short — barely two sips — but elegant, bold, and quite a pleasant blend of herbal pungency, some spice, and an edge of fruitiness. Served in custom ceramics with sparkling water on the side.

The Pinhole Coffee refurbed 1989 La Marzocco Linea The Pinhole Coffee espresso

They also offer a Chemex for two ($8), a very-Brooklyn kiduccino (made with cinnamon, $2), and something she calls a piccolo ($3). The piccolo is not inspired so much by its size (nor Sammy Piccolo of Canadian barista fame), but more by JoEllen’s Piccolo Plumbing landlord. It’s a short shot with more milk than a macchiato (served as a 1:1 ratio) served in a logo glass, modeled after the Intelligentsia mothership’s since-vanished cortado. (It is still a bit milky for our tastes.)

All that aside, one of the best things about this place is that they are truly trying to be an integrated neighborhood café. This ain’t no fly-by-night pop-up.

Read the review of Pinhole Coffee in Bernal Heights.

View of the house drink menu inside Pinhole Coffee The Pinhole Coffee piccolo

UPDATE: October 31, 2014
Curiously enough, today Australia’s GoodFood posted an article about the piccolo latte as a Sydney invention and something suggestively close to the cortado as well: Good Food – Mugshot: The Piccolo latte. But here the ration of espresso to milk is stated as 3:5, not 1:1, so it’s even milkier.

Trip Report: Red Door Coffee (SOMA)

Posted by on 23 Oct 2014 | Filed under: Café Society, Local Brew

111 Minna has long been something of an art gallery space and night club, frequently packing long lines of SOMA patrons seeking out the DJ set. It’s what happens during the daytime that’s changed here.

They’ve closed up their previous efforts as an informal daytime bar and coffee shop (serving Illy beans from a Faema machine as a dubious coffee service). They have since reopened (by 2014) as a more formal daytime bar and coffee shop. Oh, sure, they’re still a gallery by day and a DJ-fueled disco bar for people far cooler than you by night. But the coffee service is now front-and-center during daylight hours rather than just an afterthought.

Entrance to 111 Minna, which by day now goes as Red Door Coffee Entering inside 111 Minna/Red Door Coffee

Seating and gallery space inside 111 Minna More gallery space and the rear bar at 111 Minna/Red Door Coffee

Decorative side door at 111 Minna/Red Door Coffee (the red door we presume?)It’s a large space with tall ceilings, wood floors, wood benches, a front bar and a decorative rear bar towards the back with a more secluded space to studiously delve into laptop zombiehood beneath art installations. At the front bar they now use a two-group La Marzocco Linea, pulling shots of Four Barrel (also for sale).

Using the Friendo Blendo blend, it’s a significantly better shot than before — with a sharper edge of acidity on a mostly pungent flavor of herbs, spices, and a touch of sourness at the finish. Now served in notNeutral cups.

A worthy upgrade to the coffee standards here. You can see why they now expect to capitalize on those investments. (After all, they invested enough to give the coffee bar its own separate name here.)

Read the review of Red Door Coffee in SOMA.

111 Minna branding over the central bar Inside the rear bar at 111 Minna: beware of laptop zombies

La Marzocco Linea at the counter of Red Door Coffee inside 111 Minna The Red Door Coffee espresso

Trip Report: Sightglass (Mission/Potrero Hill)

Posted by on 29 Sep 2014 | Filed under: Local Brew, Roasting

Some call this neighborhood the eastern Mission. But avenues with the names of states always say “Potrero Hill” to us, despite being in the flatlands.

This 1,200-square-foot retail space and small roasting operation of Sightglass opened in Feb. 2014. There’s outdoor sidewalk bench seating in front and a narrow wall of merchandising (coffee and brewing equipment) as you walk in the door.

Entrance to Sightglass in Potrero Hill (OK, Mission if you must) Seating area inside Sightglass in Potrero Hill

While a much smaller space than the Sightglass mothership, it has a tall, airy ceiling — made with a bit of reclaimed wood, that trendy building material that costs more than Carrara marble. It has an old-style white-and-black tile floor, four mounted counter tables with a mix of booth and stool seating, and walls decorated with roasted coffee bags.

Wall o' merchandising at the entrance of Sightglass in Potrero HillIn one corner is a 1960’s-era 5-kg Probat they discovered in South Africa for exclusive roasts that they perform for this location only. They have a single origin bar here for that. Using dueling two-group La Marzocco Strada machines, they pull shots with an even medium brown crema with a little miniature speckling.

We reviewed the Jerboa’s Jump Espresso blend here — one of the location’s specialties — rather than the single origin of the day. It has a fruity aroma, but it lacks the strong acidity in the cup you come to expect from Sightglass‘ sledgehammer roasting and flavor profile style. Also unlike the typical Sightglass roast, it has a decent body, and the flavor is primarily centered around some herbal pungency with some woodiness.

Locals might whine about snooty service, but we had no such problem. Served with sparkling or still water on the side in Le Porcellane d’ANCAP logo cups.

Read the review of Sightglass in SF’s Mission/Potrero Hill.

Sightglass dueling La Marzocco Strada machines with Probat roaster in the back The Sightglass (Potrero Hill) espresso

Trip Report: The Interval at The Long Now Foundation (Marina)

Posted by on 20 Sep 2014 | Filed under: Café Society, Local Brew

The Interval is the bar, coffee shop, and meeting space at the headquarters of The Long Now Foundation, which publicly strives to think in terms of 10,000 year timeframes. So it’s a particularly rational thing that this isn’t a pop-up café given our current obsession with disposable culture. Which is a lot more than we can say for the regular Off The Grid food truck encampment, as it now has a permanent, very much on-the-grid sign for itself at the Ft. Mason Center. (Don’t get us started on the authenticity of food truck culture.)

Entrance to The Interval at The Long Now Foundation in Fort Mason Not your typical bar - inside The Interval

Bookcases and rear bar inside The Interval Private rooms against the Bay inside The Interval

The Interval is an engaging, well-designed space with a full service bar, curious machinery throughout the décor, and lots of bookcases with a spiral iron staircase up the middle of it all. There’s a long glass shared table over an extended metal block of gears.

Rows of glass flasks for St. George spirits on the bar ceiling of The IntervalIt’s a great bar space above all. The ceiling also contains a collection of flasks — to be personally managed with the infusion of St. George spirits (for the small reservation fee of “just” $500). There’s also booth seating in the back towards the Bay plus a write-your-ideas community blackboard that reminded us of Origin Coffee Roasting in Cape Town.

Using a two-group La Marzocco Linea at the bar, they pull shots with a rich-looking, even, medium brown crema. It has a strong, potent flavor but doesn’t come across too sharp — which is rare for Sightglass coffee. It has the pungency of cloves, some honey-like edges, and a lot of cherry in its flavor. Served in green hand pottery thrown by the über-trendy folks at Atelier Dion.

Read the review of The Interval at The Long Now Foundation in SF’s Marina District.

The Interval's La Marzocco Linea behind the bar Espresso at The Interval

Trip Report: Moonside Bakery and Cafe (Half Moon Bay, CA)

Posted by on 11 Sep 2014 | Filed under: Foreign Brew, Local Brew

We’ve written before about the questionable coffee situation in Half Moon Bay. Another one of the town’s exceptions to a coffee flashback to 1988 San Francisco is downtown’s Moonside Bakery and Cafe.

This bakery/café has been around for over 20 years. It may get mixed reviews for its service and some of its pastries, but they deserve special mention for sometimes making the most out of Equator Estate coffee where many other locations have struggled with the product. They offer sidewalk seating out front among parasols for all those grand sunny days in Half Moon Bay (OK, that’s a joke for you tourists). There are two tiny tables inside and an indoor rear patio with a lot more café tables and chairs in the back — inside the Courtyard Shops warehouse space.

Entrance to Moonside Bakery & Cafe in Half Moon Bay Service counter inside Moonside Bakery & Cafe

Baked goods and an oven inside Moonside Bakery & Cafe Rear seating of the Moonside Bakery & Cafe in the Courtyard Shops warehouse space

The key to the quality of the shot, which they make from a two-group La Marzocco Linea at the back, is in its shortness: a mere two sips for a single when it’s excellent, three or more sips when it’s just pretty good.

When pulled short, they leave a thin layer of a chocolatey, dark brown crema — which isn’t very impressive save for its color. But when it almost looks like two sips of hot chocolate, the body is dense and the shot is robust, potent, full-bodied, with a flavor of cinnamon, chocolate, and very few bright notes. Normally on longer shots (three or more sips) the crema is an even, medium brown. As a longer shot, the flavor is more typical: herbal pungency with some woodiness, a minimal chocolate edge, and few bright notes.

Served in mismatched Delco, Tuxton, Lubiana, or Vertex cups and saucers — depending on what’s available. Honestly, guys — did you hold up a flea market for these?

The milk-frothing here can be firm but not too stiff, creamy without being dry, and served in regular coffee mugs. While it can be one of the best Equator shots around when it’s short, it’s not consistently so. Sigh.

Read the review of the Moonside Bakery and Cafe in Half Moon Bay, CA.

La Marzocco Linea behind Moonside Bakery & Cafe The Moonside Bakery & Cafe espresso and dogged-looking cappuccino

Trip Report: Rustic Bakery Café (Larkspur Landing, Larkspur, CA)

Posted by on 05 Sep 2014 | Filed under: Foreign Brew, Local Brew

Rustic Bakery has earned awards for its baked goods, but its espresso service is surprisingly good. This location sits at the end of the Larkspur Landing for the incoming ferries, in the Marin Country Mart.

They have extensive outdoor space with white-painted wooden picnic tables under parasols at multiple zones around the building. Inside they have some stool seating among shared, long tables. They serve many baked goods in addition to salads, sandwiches, and wines.

Outdoor patio in front of Rustic Bakery Café at Larkspur Landing Service and some seating areas inside Rustic Bakery Café

Baked goods on offer inside Rustic Bakery Café Lines can get long inside Rustic Bakery Café

For espresso, they serve Stumptown from a two-group La Marzocco Linea behind the cashiers. It is a daringly short shot — almost just a single sip — with a textured medium brown crema.

While most Americans might complain about the scant volume — a sign advertises a 4-oz pour that’s closer to 1-oz — the result is potent and yet balanced. It has a potent aroma, and it provides a single sip with good (not overly extensive) body and potency. There’s some molasses and modest spices in the flavor mix, and it’s surprisingly lacking the Stumptown brightness bomb acidity.

This is arguably one of the best expressions of Stumptown coffee we’ve encountered anywhere, including various Stumptown cafés. Served in classic black Nuova Point cups.

Read the review of Rustic Bakery Café in Larkspur Landing, Larkspur, CA.

La Marzocco Linea inside Rustic Bakery Café The espresso at Rustic Bakery Café

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