111 Minna has long been something of an art gallery space and night club, frequently packing long lines of SOMA patrons seeking out the DJ set. It’s what happens during the daytime that’s changed here.

They’ve closed up their previous efforts as an informal daytime bar and coffee shop (serving Illy beans from a Faema machine as a dubious coffee service). They have since reopened (by 2014) as a more formal daytime bar and coffee shop. Oh, sure, they’re still a gallery by day and a DJ-fueled disco bar for people far cooler than you by night. But the coffee service is now front-and-center during daylight hours rather than just an afterthought.

Entrance to 111 Minna, which by day now goes as Red Door Coffee Entering inside 111 Minna/Red Door Coffee

Seating and gallery space inside 111 Minna More gallery space and the rear bar at 111 Minna/Red Door Coffee

Decorative side door at 111 Minna/Red Door Coffee (the red door we presume?)It’s a large space with tall ceilings, wood floors, wood benches, a front bar and a decorative rear bar towards the back with a more secluded space to studiously delve into laptop zombiehood beneath art installations. At the front bar they now use a two-group La Marzocco Linea, pulling shots of Four Barrel (also for sale).

Using the Friendo Blendo blend, it’s a significantly better shot than before — with a sharper edge of acidity on a mostly pungent flavor of herbs, spices, and a touch of sourness at the finish. Now served in notNeutral cups.

A worthy upgrade to the coffee standards here. You can see why they now expect to capitalize on those investments. (After all, they invested enough to give the coffee bar its own separate name here.)

Read the review of Red Door Coffee in SOMA.

111 Minna branding over the central bar Inside the rear bar at 111 Minna: beware of laptop zombies

La Marzocco Linea at the counter of Red Door Coffee inside 111 Minna The Red Door Coffee espresso