September 2014

Monthly Archive

Trip Report: Sightglass (Mission/Potrero Hill)

Posted by on 29 Sep 2014 | Filed under: Local Brew, Roasting

Some call this neighborhood the eastern Mission. But avenues with the names of states always say “Potrero Hill” to us, despite being in the flatlands.

This 1,200-square-foot retail space and small roasting operation of Sightglass opened in Feb. 2014. There’s outdoor sidewalk bench seating in front and a narrow wall of merchandising (coffee and brewing equipment) as you walk in the door.

Entrance to Sightglass in Potrero Hill (OK, Mission if you must) Seating area inside Sightglass in Potrero Hill

While a much smaller space than the Sightglass mothership, it has a tall, airy ceiling — made with a bit of reclaimed wood, that trendy building material that costs more than Carrara marble. It has an old-style white-and-black tile floor, four mounted counter tables with a mix of booth and stool seating, and walls decorated with roasted coffee bags.

Wall o' merchandising at the entrance of Sightglass in Potrero HillIn one corner is a 1960’s-era 5-kg Probat they discovered in South Africa for exclusive roasts that they perform for this location only. They have a single origin bar here for that. Using dueling two-group La Marzocco Strada machines, they pull shots with an even medium brown crema with a little miniature speckling.

We reviewed the Jerboa’s Jump Espresso blend here — one of the location’s specialties — rather than the single origin of the day. It has a fruity aroma, but it lacks the strong acidity in the cup you come to expect from Sightglass‘ sledgehammer roasting and flavor profile style. Also unlike the typical Sightglass roast, it has a decent body, and the flavor is primarily centered around some herbal pungency with some woodiness.

Locals might whine about snooty service, but we had no such problem. Served with sparkling or still water on the side in Le Porcellane d’ANCAP logo cups.

Read the review of Sightglass in SF’s Mission/Potrero Hill.

Sightglass dueling La Marzocco Strada machines with Probat roaster in the back The Sightglass (Potrero Hill) espresso

Trip Report: The Interval at The Long Now Foundation (Marina)

Posted by on 20 Sep 2014 | Filed under: Café Society, Local Brew

The Interval is the bar, coffee shop, and meeting space at the headquarters of The Long Now Foundation, which publicly strives to think in terms of 10,000 year timeframes. So it’s a particularly rational thing that this isn’t a pop-up café given our current obsession with disposable culture. Which is a lot more than we can say for the regular Off The Grid food truck encampment, as it now has a permanent, very much on-the-grid sign for itself at the Ft. Mason Center. (Don’t get us started on the authenticity of food truck culture.)

Entrance to The Interval at The Long Now Foundation in Fort Mason Not your typical bar - inside The Interval

Bookcases and rear bar inside The Interval Private rooms against the Bay inside The Interval

The Interval is an engaging, well-designed space with a full service bar, curious machinery throughout the décor, and lots of bookcases with a spiral iron staircase up the middle of it all. There’s a long glass shared table over an extended metal block of gears.

Rows of glass flasks for St. George spirits on the bar ceiling of The IntervalIt’s a great bar space above all. The ceiling also contains a collection of flasks — to be personally managed with the infusion of St. George spirits (for the small reservation fee of “just” $500). There’s also booth seating in the back towards the Bay plus a write-your-ideas community blackboard that reminded us of Origin Coffee Roasting in Cape Town.

Using a two-group La Marzocco Linea at the bar, they pull shots with a rich-looking, even, medium brown crema. It has a strong, potent flavor but doesn’t come across too sharp — which is rare for Sightglass coffee. It has the pungency of cloves, some honey-like edges, and a lot of cherry in its flavor. Served in green hand pottery thrown by the über-trendy folks at Atelier Dion.

Read the review of The Interval at The Long Now Foundation in SF’s Marina District.

The Interval's La Marzocco Linea behind the bar Espresso at The Interval

Trip Report: Moonside Bakery and Cafe (Half Moon Bay, CA)

Posted by on 11 Sep 2014 | Filed under: Foreign Brew, Local Brew

We’ve written before about the questionable coffee situation in Half Moon Bay. Another one of the town’s exceptions to a coffee flashback to 1988 San Francisco is downtown’s Moonside Bakery and Cafe.

This bakery/café has been around for over 20 years. It may get mixed reviews for its service and some of its pastries, but they deserve special mention for sometimes making the most out of Equator Estate coffee where many other locations have struggled with the product. They offer sidewalk seating out front among parasols for all those grand sunny days in Half Moon Bay (OK, that’s a joke for you tourists). There are two tiny tables inside and an indoor rear patio with a lot more café tables and chairs in the back — inside the Courtyard Shops warehouse space.

Entrance to Moonside Bakery & Cafe in Half Moon Bay Service counter inside Moonside Bakery & Cafe

Baked goods and an oven inside Moonside Bakery & Cafe Rear seating of the Moonside Bakery & Cafe in the Courtyard Shops warehouse space

The key to the quality of the shot, which they make from a two-group La Marzocco Linea at the back, is in its shortness: a mere two sips for a single when it’s excellent, three or more sips when it’s just pretty good.

When pulled short, they leave a thin layer of a chocolatey, dark brown crema — which isn’t very impressive save for its color. But when it almost looks like two sips of hot chocolate, the body is dense and the shot is robust, potent, full-bodied, with a flavor of cinnamon, chocolate, and very few bright notes. Normally on longer shots (three or more sips) the crema is an even, medium brown. As a longer shot, the flavor is more typical: herbal pungency with some woodiness, a minimal chocolate edge, and few bright notes.

Served in mismatched Delco, Tuxton, Lubiana, or Vertex cups and saucers — depending on what’s available. Honestly, guys — did you hold up a flea market for these?

The milk-frothing here can be firm but not too stiff, creamy without being dry, and served in regular coffee mugs. While it can be one of the best Equator shots around when it’s short, it’s not consistently so. Sigh.

Read the review of the Moonside Bakery and Cafe in Half Moon Bay, CA.

La Marzocco Linea behind Moonside Bakery & Cafe The Moonside Bakery & Cafe espresso and dogged-looking cappuccino

Trip Report: Rustic Bakery Café (Larkspur Landing, Larkspur, CA)

Posted by on 05 Sep 2014 | Filed under: Foreign Brew, Local Brew

Rustic Bakery has earned awards for its baked goods, but its espresso service is surprisingly good. This location sits at the end of the Larkspur Landing for the incoming ferries, in the Marin Country Mart.

They have extensive outdoor space with white-painted wooden picnic tables under parasols at multiple zones around the building. Inside they have some stool seating among shared, long tables. They serve many baked goods in addition to salads, sandwiches, and wines.

Outdoor patio in front of Rustic Bakery Café at Larkspur Landing Service and some seating areas inside Rustic Bakery Café

Baked goods on offer inside Rustic Bakery Café Lines can get long inside Rustic Bakery Café

For espresso, they serve Stumptown from a two-group La Marzocco Linea behind the cashiers. It is a daringly short shot — almost just a single sip — with a textured medium brown crema.

While most Americans might complain about the scant volume — a sign advertises a 4-oz pour that’s closer to 1-oz — the result is potent and yet balanced. It has a potent aroma, and it provides a single sip with good (not overly extensive) body and potency. There’s some molasses and modest spices in the flavor mix, and it’s surprisingly lacking the Stumptown brightness bomb acidity.

This is arguably one of the best expressions of Stumptown coffee we’ve encountered anywhere, including various Stumptown cafés. Served in classic black Nuova Point cups.

Read the review of Rustic Bakery Café in Larkspur Landing, Larkspur, CA.

La Marzocco Linea inside Rustic Bakery Café The espresso at Rustic Bakery Café