Like it’s more famous and cosmopolitan sister, the island of Ischia resides in the Gulf of Naples. But that’s where the similarities end.

Capri draws mostly international tourists on day trips seeking the fashionable high-life. Years ago while hiking Capri’s (highly recommended) Villa Jovis around 8am one Sunday morning, a peek over a cliff’s edge revealed a marine invasion of ferries and tour boats from all directions that must have rivaled D-Day on the beaches of Normandy.

castello Aragonese at Ischia Ponte Entrance to Bar Cocò in the shadow of Ischia's Castello Aragonese

By contrast, Ischia draws far more tourists and yet has a completely different feel. For one, 80% of the tourists are Italians — most of whom stay overnight. Ischia is a larger island and supports a much greater number of local residents, giving it a strong sense of community. The island feels more like a connected suburb of Napoli (despite the one-hour-plus boat ride). And then there are the spas and hot springs.

For San Francisco area residents, imagine if Angel Island was encircled by a few smaller, more casual versions of Sausalito. Except Ischia goes back to at least Greek settlers in the 8th century B.C.

Italians socializing at Bar Cocò along the castle bridge Italians strolling past Bar Cocò in the shadow of the Castello Aragonese on Ischia

All generations socialize outside of Bar Cocò Footbridge from Castello Aragonese to the main town of Ischia Ponte

As for Ristorante e Bar Cocò: what a complete scene. It’s hard to overstate how much this local café resides at the center of an entire island’s social fabric. A combination bar and restaurant, this Ischia institution opened in 1951. The island locals who flock here partly do so out of the quality of the place, but perhaps moreso because of its stunning location: along the shores at the base of the footpath that leads to the dramatic Castello Aragonese.

The island of Ischia from Castello AragoneseBuilt by Hiero I, tyrant of Sicily, in 474 B.C., the site of this castle has since been alternatively sacked/occupied/expanded by Parthenopeans, Romans, Visigoths, Vandals, Goths, Arabs, Normans, Swabians, the Angioini, English, and the Bourbons.

Mornings, afternoons, and (in particular) evenings, people gather at this watering hole at the base of the footpath to eat, drink, and mostly socialize beneath the shadow of the castle. There are many Italians sitting out front for table service beneath a thatched roof (where they serve €1.70 espresso instead of the in-bar €1). Inside there’s only a cashier and standing at the bar — other than seating inside the neighboring restaurant with shorter hours.

Thatched entrance to Bar Cocò Service bar area inside Bar Cocò

At the bar they use a four-group lever La San Marco machine to pull dense, syrupy shots of Caffè Moreno. It has a dense thickness and outstanding body with an even, dark brown crema that looks a bit like a dark brown egg yolk at times.

A two-sips short shot with a deep, darker flavor of pungent herbs and cloves served in Cocò-logo IPA cups. No wonder the 2014 Bar d’Italia rated them two chicchi (and one tazzina).

Read the review of Bar Cocò in Ischia Ponte, Italy.

Manual La San Marco machine at the bar inside Bar Cocò The Bar Cocò espresso

Entrance to the neighboring Ristoranti Cocò along the footbridge The Bar Cocò logo IPA espresso cup is an homage to the Castello Aragonese