For many years, this tiny doorway was once home to the Ravello post office in the heart of town. We know, because we tried to ship three bottles of a great Taurasi back to the U.S. from there. To this day, some 11 years later, it still hasn’t made it, and we don’t suspect it was lost in the mail. Unless if by “lost” you mean consumed in an afternoon of drunken debauchery by the local postman.

But in the Spring of 2011, owners Antonio Di Martino, the local restauranteur Rispoli family, and sommelier Angela Donatatonio opened this space up as the new Caffè Duomo. It’s now a somewhat cramped café (as it was a post office): two small tables inside seat three. But it’s the outside space in the main square under parasols that matters.

Brooding skies over Caffè Duomo's outdoor seating in Piazza Vescovado, Ravello, Italy A former post office, this is the entrance to Caffè Duomo with the cordial Antonio sitting just to the left of the steps

It is popular with the locals and tourists alike: well-heeled locals stop here for a quick caffè, while enough tourists stop by for to-go cup lattes to justify a paper sign in English on bathroom use etiquette when the wedding season is high. Antonio is always about, and he’s a great, friendly guy to get to know: regular customers get the warmest of greetings.

Using a three-group manual lever La San Marco behind the small bar, they pull shots of Qualeat (from the Perrella brothers near Avellino) that are properly short, concentrated, and modestly fill a Duomo-logo regulation IPA tazzina.

The crema is an even darker brown with some texture. Flavorwise, the shot is balanced, heavy on pungency, but yet not the typically heavy dark you get in much of Campania. Caffè Duomo is arguably the new gold standard in town for caffè and fresh cornetti. (Sorry, Caffè Calce.) An even €1.

Read the review of Caffè Duomo in Ravello, Italy.

The tiny space inside Caffè Duomo with their La San Marco lever machine in the corner The Caffè Duomo espresso in a logo cup: a fine one indeed